Urban & Architecture Photography

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Urban Exploration Photography in Glasgow: Springburn Park Winter Gardens
Springburn Park Urbex Photography

I have to admit I do not much urbex photography.  To be brutally honest, I’m too unfit to go clambering around old buildings that may crumble and fall at any time - I enjoy the use of all my limbs too much for these types of risks.

Truth be told, this was not really an urbex shoot per se.  I have walked around Springburn Park countless times and for some bizarre reason I had never got round to photographing this wonderful building.  Luckily for me, the previously padlocked gates and security fences had been prised open which meant I could walk the site.

There is something gloriously beautiful about this type of derelict building.  I think it is the fact that it is so easy to visualise them in the former glory; beautiful iron work, blooming flowers, the visitors ambling around the interior, resting for tea and cake.

Springburn Park Winter Gardens Glasgow
Springburn Winter Gardens Derelict Glasgow
Springburn Park Green House
Urbex Glasgow Springburn Park
Urbex Glasgow Greenhouse Springburn
Springburn Winter Gardens Architecture Details

I decided to use a couple of vintage Canon nFD lenses on this shoot – the Canon nFD 24mm 2.8 and the Canon nFD 100mm 2.8.  I have used the 100mm 2.8 on many occasions but this was my first outing with the 24mm 2.8 and which I have to say I found the lens handled very well and captured lovely colours.

These images are the first photographs I have processed using Capture One.  I finally decided to give it a proper try out because Lightroom is just becoming turtle slow for me.  It is early days but so far I am very happy with what I can achieve in Capture One.  The speed difference alone makes the program worthy of consideration.

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Soviet Bus Stops by Christopher Herwig: a unique photographic perspective of the former Soviet Union
Christopher Herwig Soviet Bus Stops

I can honestly say I never saw myself ever purchasing a book filled with photographs of bus stops from the former Soviet Union.  Truth be told, I walked past this book (I still actually visit book shops!) time and time again questioning why anyone would ever buy such a thing but as my love for architecture has grown I find myself seeking inspiration from places I had previously thought absurd.

Herwig’s photographs emphasise the vast array of architectural styles within such a genre.  Some are simple box structures while others display a militaristic zeal.  Many show religious or artistic flourishes while others are purely functional. Some are beautifully pristine and others lie in ruin.

Christopher Herwig’s fabulous Soviet Bus Stops contains photographs from fourteen Soviet states and his photographs from these countries provide a cultural, artistic and historical snapshot of the Soviet Union from a very unique perspective.

Herwig Soviet Bus Stops Photography 3

You can see more of Christopher Herwig’s work here

You can also check out my inspiration for more book recommendations

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DETAILS: Title: Soviet Bus Stops.  Author: Christopher Herwig. Format: Hardback. Size: 160x200mm. Pages: 192pp. Photographs: 159. ISBN: 978-0-9931911-0-7. Publisher: Fuel (2015).

Vintage lens review: Canon FD 50mm 1.4 on Fujifilm XT2

Canon's vintage FD lenses have a great reputation for price and performance so I was interested to see how this lens fared on my trusty Fujifilm XT2, In this review I cover how the lens fares as a photography and a video lens.

UPDATE: For clarification this review is based on the newer FDn version of this lens

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Shooting handheld video with the Fujinon XF 18-55mm: How good is Fujifilm's image stabilisation?

I finally got round to buying the Fujinon Lens XF 18-55mm F2.8-4 R LM OIS to use on my XT2 camera. I bought this lens specifically for video due to the lens having Fujifilm’s Optical Image Stabilisation built in to the lens.

To give the lens a quick test run down by the riverside in Glasgow's city centre where I shot all of my footage handheld at 30 fps - no stabilisation was applied whatsoever - I did not use any gimbals, tripods or any other balancing aids (including software) to smooth the footage. What you see is out of camera with a little colour correction applied.

Personally I thought the stabilisation worked fantastically well - I can only image how great the footage would look on the XH1 with its IBIS… but that is for another time, hopefully.

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