Adobe Lightroom

How do Fujifilm's film simulations affect the look and feel of your photographs?

I wrote a blog post a while back about this very topic but I was never really happy with it. Perhaps it was because the image I selected did not really emphasise how Fujifilm's fantastic film simulations can affect the look and feel of your photographs.  Sometimes this is dramatic while others can be more subtle.

Personally, I am huge fan of Acros and Velvia simulations but whatever your favourite they make a fantastic starting point in post processing if you are a RAW shooter like myself.

Checking out Fujifilm's film simulations: sample RAW images from the x-t2

Well it has been a long time coming but I am finally making the move from Nikon to Fujifilm.  Honestly, I have become so sick of lugging around a heavy dslr and lenses around the city that it was really starting to grind me down so moving to a lighter system was something I had been considering for a long time.  For me, the move to mirroless was almost entirely based on the smaller weight and size of the body size and lenses.

That being said I thought I might blog about any issues, ideas or tips I have as I begin dipping my toes in the Fujifilm mirrorless world.

First up, I thought it may be useful to view samples of Fujifilm's renowned film simulations.

Just so you know.  All of these images were shot on a Fujifilm x-t2 in RAW.  I imported images in to Lightroom, applied White Balance and the Fujifilm profile - no other editing was applied, no sharpening, noise reduction, nothing.

Click on images to see a larger version.

Fujifilm VELVIA

Fujifilm PROVIA

Fujifilm ASTIA

Fujifilm PRO NEG STD

Fujifilm MONOCHROME

Fujifilm MONOCHROME + RED FILTER

Fujifilm ACROS

Fujifilm ACROS + RED FILTER

Fujifilm CLASSIC CHROME

Fujifilm PRO NEG HI

Fujifilm MONOCHROME + GREEN FILTER

Fujifilm MONOCHROME + YELLOW FILTER

Fujifilm ACROS + GREEN FILTER

Fujifilm ACROS + YELLOW FILTER

... And there you have it.  What do you think?  Are Fujifilm’s simulations all they are cracked up to be?  Do you have a particlar favourite?  Feel free to comment below.

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Four photography YouTubers actually worth watching

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Make Camera Calibration your first stop in Lightroom editing

With so many options available in Adobe Lightroom it can be difficult to know where to start.  It is all too easy just to follow the built-in work flow of Lightroom: Basic, Tone Curve, and ending with Camera Calibration.  Here I will explain why the 'camera calibration' setting should be your first port of call (after setting your white balance that is!) in order to get a good starting point in your edits.

Image imported with no edits carried out

Image imported with no edits carried out

Depending on your camera, the camera calibration tab will offer you a choice of settings which you can choose from.  You should be able to see in the second image that I have a choice between Adobe Standard, Camera Landscape, Camera Neutral, Camera Portrait, Camera Standard and Camera Vivid, again, you may have different choices depending on your camera and you should try all of these in order to get the histogram you want.

Check the two images below and note the differences between Adobe Standard and my choice of Camera Vivid.  The differences are quite subtle, however, you should be able to notice a stronger blue in the boat and the reflections on sand are more impactful.

The only difference between this and the image above is that I have chosen Camera Vivid as the calibration profile

The only difference between this and the image above is that I have chosen Camera Vivid as the calibration profile

Admittedly this is a subtle change but the point here is to find a better starting point before carrying out any in-depth editing.  You can take this process further by using the saturation sliders in this setting too.  Below you can see the next step where I have slightly tweaked the 'Blue Primary, Saturation' slider.

By increasing the saturation in the Blue Primary sliders you can see a noticeable difference in the boat

By increasing the saturation in the Blue Primary sliders you can see a noticeable difference in the boat

And that;s that.  This is a very simple technique but it really can make a difference to your editting process.  These edits took a total of 10 seconds to carry out so it clear that the often overlooked camera calibration settings can speed-up and improve your editing workflow.  Give it a try and let me know how you get on in the comments.

Got a question about Lightroom?  Leave a comment below and I'll get back to you.