Urban & Architecture Photography

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Posts tagged Buildings
Urban Exploration Photography in Glasgow: Springburn Park Winter Gardens
Springburn Park Urbex Photography

I have to admit I do not much urbex photography.  To be brutally honest, I’m too unfit to go clambering around old buildings that may crumble and fall at any time - I enjoy the use of all my limbs too much for these types of risks.

Truth be told, this was not really an urbex shoot per se.  I have walked around Springburn Park countless times and for some bizarre reason I had never got round to photographing this wonderful building.  Luckily for me, the previously padlocked gates and security fences had been prised open which meant I could walk the site.

There is something gloriously beautiful about this type of derelict building.  I think it is the fact that it is so easy to visualise them in the former glory; beautiful iron work, blooming flowers, the visitors ambling around the interior, resting for tea and cake.

Springburn Park Winter Gardens Glasgow
Springburn Winter Gardens Derelict Glasgow
Springburn Park Green House
Urbex Glasgow Springburn Park
Urbex Glasgow Greenhouse Springburn
Springburn Winter Gardens Architecture Details

I decided to use a couple of vintage Canon nFD lenses on this shoot – the Canon nFD 24mm 2.8 and the Canon nFD 100mm 2.8.  I have used the 100mm 2.8 on many occasions but this was my first outing with the 24mm 2.8 and which I have to say I found the lens handled very well and captured lovely colours.

These images are the first photographs I have processed using Capture One.  I finally decided to give it a proper try out because Lightroom is just becoming turtle slow for me.  It is early days but so far I am very happy with what I can achieve in Capture One.  The speed difference alone makes the program worthy of consideration.

Please leave any comments below and remember to check out my Youtube channel at here

Soviet Bus Stops by Christopher Herwig: a unique photographic perspective of the former Soviet Union
Christopher Herwig Soviet Bus Stops

I can honestly say I never saw myself ever purchasing a book filled with photographs of bus stops from the former Soviet Union.  Truth be told, I walked past this book (I still actually visit book shops!) time and time again questioning why anyone would ever buy such a thing but as my love for architecture has grown I find myself seeking inspiration from places I had previously thought absurd.

Herwig’s photographs emphasise the vast array of architectural styles within such a genre.  Some are simple box structures while others display a militaristic zeal.  Many show religious or artistic flourishes while others are purely functional. Some are beautifully pristine and others lie in ruin.

Christopher Herwig’s fabulous Soviet Bus Stops contains photographs from fourteen Soviet states and his photographs from these countries provide a cultural, artistic and historical snapshot of the Soviet Union from a very unique perspective.

Herwig Soviet Bus Stops Photography 3

You can see more of Christopher Herwig’s work here

You can also check out my inspiration for more book recommendations

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DETAILS: Title: Soviet Bus Stops.  Author: Christopher Herwig. Format: Hardback. Size: 160x200mm. Pages: 192pp. Photographs: 159. ISBN: 978-0-9931911-0-7. Publisher: Fuel (2015).

Break free from the tyranny of perfect sharpness and learn to love vintage lenses: the Auto Chinon 35mm 2.8

I am starting to really enjoy trying out these vintage lenses on the Fujifilm X-T2.  The ability to easily pick up a lot of vintage lenses very cheaply means I can experiment with various focal lengths without forking out a fortune each time I want a new lens.  I managed to pick up the Auto Chinon 35mm 2.8 for about £20, so even if I tried the lens and hated it I could easily sell it on again with minimal loss.  Hopefully.

Abstract photography Science Centre Glasgow.jpg

I actually bought the lens on eBay a few months but just never got round to using it until recently.  It is a pretty decent copy with no obvious marks on the lens elements.  As expected the Chinon is a wee bit heavier than my modern Fujifilm primes but no real issue.  The aperture ring is nice and clicky so it was simple to select whatever aperture I needed.  The focus ring is also very smooth and worked well.

What I love about using vintage lenses is that they free me from the tyranny of perfect sharpness – certainly with cheaper lenses like this I will not achieve that anyway – but I find this means I am more willing to experiment with composition, textures, blur and abstraction.  I have also found myself shooting far more black and white photography (as I am sure you will be able to tell from the sample photos).

Textures on gravestone at Necropolis.jpg

I have only taken this lens out to use on two occasions but what struck me immediately was how awkward it felt using the 35mm focal length.  Most of my photography is taken at 23mm or below so 35mm just felt a bit off.  It took me at least 30 minutes before I felt I was ‘seeing’ properly with the lens.  This another reason I like trying out these lens as I can take myself out of my comfort zone by using focal lengths that I do not normally use.

The Auto Chinon is a nice lens.  For me, it worked especially well as a black and white lens.  The tonal range seemed pretty good to my eyes although it did lack contrast.  It also seemed to work very well in conjunction with Acros film simulations on the X-T2.  Colours were not particularly vibrant, although to be perfectly honest on both occasions the weather was dull and overcast meaning there was a dearth of colour available anyway.  At a price of around £20 the Auto Chinon 35mm 2.8 is a lens that is definitely worth seeking out.

Glasgow Science Centre exterior.jpg

If you any questions or comments regarding this lens please comment below.

For more information about the Auto Chinon 35mm 2.8 click here.

Testing out vintage camera lenses on the Fujifilm X-T2: shooting with Helios 44-2

Photography with classic lenses was never something I have previously considered.  However, since starting to shoot with Fuji mirrorless I have read a lot about using adaptors in order to use these older lenses, how cheap old lenses (generally) are, and how the results can be interesting / inspiring / infuriating / something a bit different… so I decided to give it a go.

Luckily, I actually already had a Helios 44-2, 56mm, f2 lens at home on an old Zenit film camera I bought a few years back, purely as an ornament.  So in order to use the lens, all I had to do was buy an M42 to Fuji X adaptor ring. These are easy to find and reasonably cheap on eBay.

There was a definite blue hue in this shot. Fuji Velvia simulation applied

There was a definite blue hue in this shot. Fuji Velvia simulation applied

Before the adaptor arrived I did a bit of reading online and discovered that the Helios was a very widely produced Russian lens and is probably one of the most popular choices among people starting out with adapted lenses.  It can be bought for around £20 to £30 depending on condition.  My copy is fairly battered, and the lens has a fair bit of surface scratches as well as having dust inside.  It is definitely far from mint condition but there seems to be no effect on the images rendered.

I have to admit I really enjoyed using this lens.  All classic lenses like this must be used in manual focus, so for some people this can take a bit a time to get used too.  However, by turning on focus peaking in your camera you make life so much easier for yourself.  The only awkwardness I experienced was due to lens design: the aperture ring sits too close to the focus ring so it is too easy to move wrong ring.  Also the aperture is fluid so unless I was shooting at f2 or f16 I basically had to rough guess at an aperture setting.

Back and white has a real vintage look here. Really nice aged tones. Fuji Acros applied

Back and white has a real vintage look here. Really nice aged tones. Fuji Acros applied

Despite these minor issues it was great fun to use and the Helios rendered some rather lovely looking images.  The lens is actually fairly sharp considering its age - definitely not as sharp as modern lenses, but sharp enough.  There is something lovely about the images its renders.  Colours are slightly askew (very blue at times) to what I am used to but look very filmic so I can live with that.  For me though, the black and white images are what make the lens worth having.  These images looked very tonal and flat which resulted in a fantastic starting point for post processing in Lightroom.  The Acros film simulation worked really well here.

So what do you think?  Would you use a classic lens like this or stick to the latest in lenses available.  Can you recommend a lens to try out?  Feel free to comment below.