Urban & Architecture Photography

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Posts tagged Edinburgh
How does a 40-year-old lens measure up on the Fujifilm XT2? Sample photographs from the Jupiter-8 f2 50mm

The small, light and responsive Jupiter-8 was a joy to use.  I found it tremendously tactile with smooth and responsive focus and aperture rings.  It may not be the sharpest lens but the colour reproduction was lovely, most notably when applying the Velvia film simulation. Interestingly, Velvia is rarely my film simulation of choice.

More information on the various Jupter-8 lens can be found at Soviet Cams

If you have any questions about this lens or these images please leave a comment below.

The walls of Dalmarnock water treatment works are adorned with some great graffiti [XT2 / Velvia]

The walls of Dalmarnock water treatment works are adorned with some great graffiti
[XT2 / Velvia]

Graffiti on the old Dalmarnock railway bridge [XT2 / Velvia]

Graffiti on the old Dalmarnock railway bridge
[XT2 / Velvia]

Dalmarnock Bridge [XT2 / Velvia]

Dalmarnock Bridge
[XT2 / Velvia]

New housing being constructed in Dalmarnock [XT2 / Acros]

New housing being constructed in Dalmarnock
[XT2 / Acros]

Photography with vintage lenses: trying out the Soligor 135mm 3.5 on Fujifilm XT2

The Soligor 135mm 3.5 is an unusual focal length for me. I have been keen to try out this focal length to take architecture and abstract shots when in the city.  Here are a few sample shots I took over a couple of days ambling around in Glasgow and Edinburgh.

Looking out over Waverley Station toward the Old Town [XT2 / Provia]

Looking out over Waverley Station toward the Old Town
[XT2 / Provia]

Edinburgh rooftops [XT2 / Acros+R]

Edinburgh rooftops
[XT2 / Acros+R]

Riverboat Casino [XT2 / Classic Chrome]

Riverboat Casino
[XT2 / Classic Chrome]

Love locks [XT"2 / Acros+G]

Love locks
[XT"2 / Acros+G]

If you have any questions about this lens or these images please leave a comment below.

You can discover in depth information about the Soligor 135mm 3.5 at PentaxForums.com

Discover why the National Museum of Scotland is such an amazing location for photography

I have to be honest I initially travelled through to Edinburgh to try out some street photography.  I thought the Edinburgh Festival crowds would be a great time to try something different but the vast crowds meant I could barely walk three inches without bumping into someone or being held up in an endless stream of festival goers.

I decided to avoid the crowds and visit the National Museum of Scotland on Chambers Street.  I am glad I did, the space is fantastic and absolutely amazing for some interesting photography.

Top level of the museum. Shot at 1/160, f8, ISO 400 @ 35mm

Top level of the museum. Shot at 1/160, f8, ISO 400 @ 35mm

The image above was taken on level three of the older part of the building.  As you can see this part of the building is light, airy and in places ornate.  It lends itself perfectly to some interior architectural photography.

The shot below was taken in the modern area of the building and there are plenty of opportunities to create light, minimalist style images such as this.

The ground floor is beautifully spacious and airy: Shot at 1/125, f5.6, ISO 400 @ 35mm

The ground floor is beautifully spacious and airy: Shot at 1/125, f5.6, ISO 400 @ 35mm

Inside and out the, the museum offers ample opportunties to create a very interesting photographs.  The shot below shows the exterior of the newer style building.  The combination of line, shape, and texture provide very interesting compositions.

These are only two of the images I shot at the museum.  I intend to get back again soon, this time with a more than my 35mm lens to take the beauty of this space.  What do you think?  Have you ever visited the museum?  Do you have any shots you'd like to share?

Where to photograph in Edinburgh: Four hours in Leith

Being a 'Leither' it is always great to get back to 'Sunny Leith'.  However, with my time limited to just four hours I'll have to chance my luck with the weather and have planned to focus my energies in the 'Shore' area of the town.

The Victoria Swing Bridge crosses the Water of Leith in the dock area. Completed in 1874 it was originally used to transfer goods from shipos to storgae areas in docks

The Victoria Swing Bridge crosses the Water of Leith in the dock area. Completed in 1874 it was originally used to transfer goods from shipos to storgae areas in docks

Leith has undergone a mass of regeneration over the last twenty or so years with many new buildings having been built along the 'Shore' area and beyond.  As such, Leith is a heady mix of the old and modern meaning it is a must visit for any photographer in and around Edinburgh.  Get down there!

Originally a port town, Leith built up around the docks.  Parts of the docks are still in use so there is always activity in the area.  What is also great to see is that despite the regeneration, many original original pieces of Leith's architecture are easily found.