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Posts tagged Nikkor 35mm
Amazing Edinburgh photo locations: the National Museum of Scotland

I have to be honest I initially travelled through to Edinburgh to try out some street photography.  I thought the Edinburgh Festival crowds would be a great time to try something different but the vast crowds meant I could barely walk three inches without bumping into someone or being held up in an endless stream of festival goers.

I decided to avoid the crowds and visit the National Museum of Scotland on Chambers Street.  I am glad I did, the space is fantastic and absolutely amazing for some interesting photography.

Top level of the museum. Shot at 1/160, f8, ISO 400 @ 35mm

Top level of the museum. Shot at 1/160, f8, ISO 400 @ 35mm

The image above was taken on level three of the older part of the building.  As you can see this part of the building is light, airy and in places ornate.  It lends itself perfectly to some interior architectural photography.

The shot below was taken in the modern area of the building and there are plenty of opportunities to create light, minimalist style images such as this.

The ground floor is beautifully spacious and airy: Shot at 1/125, f5.6, ISO 400 @ 35mm

The ground floor is beautifully spacious and airy: Shot at 1/125, f5.6, ISO 400 @ 35mm

Inside and out the, the museum offers ample opportunties to create a very interesting photographs.  The shot below shows the exterior of the newer style building.  The combination of line, shape, and texture provide very interesting compositions.

These are only two of the images I shot at the museum.  I intend to get back again soon, this time with a more than my 35mm lens to take the beauty of this space.  What do you think?  Have you ever visited the museum?  Do you have any shots you'd like to share?

Hunting out architecture photo locations in Glasgow

I have written previously about the importance of scouting locations using a minimum of kit so I decided to take some of my own advice and get out and find some buildings to photograph.

Inovo building on George Street

Inovo building on George Street

Glasgow has an abundance of Edwardian, Victorian (and earlier) architecture but when I am looking for locations I am always drawn to modern buildings.  I like the shapes and different materials used.

The Inovo building (above) is another frequent visit of mine.  With fantastic angles and mixture of glass and steel on the exterior it is well worth visiting to photograph.  I really like this shot and will return fully kitted for a finished shot soon.  Aready made for a long exposure I reckon.

Strathclyde University on Cathedral Street

Strathclyde University on Cathedral Street

Strathclyde University have lots of buildings scattered all around Glasgow.  The buildings on Cathedral Street are a good mix of old and modern styles - plus, there are lots of other new buildings popping up on Cathedral Street too.

The shot above was taken looking down Cathedral Street toward Glasgow Cathedral.  The building in the foreground has an almost building block look about it - only squares and rectangles used in this part of the building. Again, I think this is worth revisiting to photograph properly.

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Great Glasgow photo locations: the Glasgow Science Centre

Sunny day photography can be a bit awkward.  The harsh light and shadows can make it difficult to get any decent shots.  However, it is possible to use this light to your advantage and make some good photographs.

The Glasgow Science Centre affords some neat opportunities for sunny day photography, especially if, like me, you are a lover of all things architecture and abstract.  The steel buildings and their shapes can provide some great shots.

Domes-Glasgow-Science-Centre

Many photographers just do not go out in this type of light.  To be honest it can be a challenge.  However, with a little thought and a polariser filter – an absolute must for reducing glare and boosting colours – it is possible to make some great shots.  Architecture is especially good to photograph in these conditions provided you navigate away from the worst of the reflections.

Close up of Armadillo building, just across the river from the Science Centre. As you can see you can use the harsh sunlight to create shadows in your image.

Close up of Armadillo building, just across the river from the Science Centre. As you can see you can use the harsh sunlight to create shadows in your image.

What do you think, do you enjoy photographing harsh light or do you avoid it all costs?  Got any suggestions for other photography locations?  Get in touch.