Urban & Architecture Photography

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Posts tagged Polarizer
Why imposing limits can boost your photography

As a photographer it is all too easy to fill up the camera bag with every single piece of kit we can physically carry and head off crooked backed spending endless hours in one spot waiting on the perfect light for one single shot.  This can be fantastic but sometimes we need to mix it up and get our minds doing something different.

I like this composition and plan to return soon. I will probably shoot it a little wider and more than likely during sunset or the blue hour

I like this composition and plan to return soon. I will probably shoot it a little wider and more than likely during sunset or the blue hour

I like to do this by imposing limits on myself.  So I made a quick trip to Stirling city centre with only one lens (Nikkor 50mm 1.8G) and two hours to make some photographs.  I like making quick trips like these; it’s a neat little exercise.  I find it is similar to how an artist would use a sketchbook – I am making quick visual notes, saving ideas on shape, compositions and possible locations which can be returned to and examined later, hopefully to create a finished photograph.  Luckily, Stirling has a very small city centre and can be easily walked around in two hours.  Also, it is a medieval city and therefore any modern architecture stands out a mile.

Abstract Forthside Bridge, Stirling Station

The Forthside Bridge became my main interest to photograph.  It is located only a minute from Stirling train station and is a stark contrast to pretty much all other architecture in the area.  It is modern and sleek and highly photographable.  I spotted the bridge as I approached the station on my train from Glasgow but decided to photograph all around the city and focus on the bridge upon my return from the station.

it is similar to how an artist would use a sketchbook ... making quick visual notes, saving ideas on shape, compositions and possible locations...

What I love most about photographing modern structures like this is that they offer great opportunities to go abstract and focus on elements with the structure as well as the structure as a whole.

In any creative pursuit imposing limits makes us think differently in order to find solutions.  As photographers it can be all too easy to just slip on a different to get the ‘perfect’ composition, but sticking to one focal length we are forced to seek out new compositions and ‘work’ a scene to get something new.

Why you really need to get down the Clyde and photograph the Glasgow Science Centre

Sunny day photography can be a bit awkward.  The harsh light and shadows can make it difficult to get any decent shots.  However, it is possible to use this light to your advantage and make some good photographs.

The Glasgow Science Centre affords some neat opportunities for sunny day photography, especially if, like me, you are a lover of all things architecture and abstract.  The steel buildings and their shapes can provide some great shots.

Domes-Glasgow-Science-Centre

Many photographers just do not go out in this type of light.  To be honest it can be a challenge.  However, with a little thought and a polariser filter – an absolute must for reducing glare and boosting colours – it is possible to make some great shots.  Architecture is especially good to photograph in these conditions provided you navigate away from the worst of the reflections.

Close up of Armadillo building, just across the river from the Science Centre. As you can see you can use the harsh sunlight to create shadows in your image.

Close up of Armadillo building, just across the river from the Science Centre. As you can see you can use the harsh sunlight to create shadows in your image.

What do you think, do you enjoy photographing harsh light or do you avoid it all costs?  Got any suggestions for other photography locations?  Get in touch.

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