Urban & Architecture Photography

Blog

Posts tagged Tutorials
Amazing Edinburgh photo locations: the National Museum of Scotland

I have to be honest I initially travelled through to Edinburgh to try out some street photography.  I thought the Edinburgh Festival crowds would be a great time to try something different but the vast crowds meant I could barely walk three inches without bumping into someone or being held up in an endless stream of festival goers.

I decided to avoid the crowds and visit the National Museum of Scotland on Chambers Street.  I am glad I did, the space is fantastic and absolutely amazing for some interesting photography.

Top level of the museum. Shot at 1/160, f8, ISO 400 @ 35mm

Top level of the museum. Shot at 1/160, f8, ISO 400 @ 35mm

The image above was taken on level three of the older part of the building.  As you can see this part of the building is light, airy and in places ornate.  It lends itself perfectly to some interior architectural photography.

The shot below was taken in the modern area of the building and there are plenty of opportunities to create light, minimalist style images such as this.

The ground floor is beautifully spacious and airy: Shot at 1/125, f5.6, ISO 400 @ 35mm

The ground floor is beautifully spacious and airy: Shot at 1/125, f5.6, ISO 400 @ 35mm

Inside and out the, the museum offers ample opportunties to create a very interesting photographs.  The shot below shows the exterior of the newer style building.  The combination of line, shape, and texture provide very interesting compositions.

These are only two of the images I shot at the museum.  I intend to get back again soon, this time with a more than my 35mm lens to take the beauty of this space.  What do you think?  Have you ever visited the museum?  Do you have any shots you'd like to share?

Four photography YouTubers actually worth watching

Enter "photography tutorial" in YouTube and you'll get over eight million results.  It's not easy finding the right content but the four channels below provide a top notch starting point for your photography needs.   

Thomas Heaton

I have been following Thomas's YouTube for about two years and I can honestly say that he is a fantastic landscape photographer.  He uploads his vlogs weekly (sometimes more frequently) about photography excursions.  He has a great eye and his photography is really top notch.

Thomas is a great host and his style is very laid back.  What's great is that he is just as likely to upload videos when trips don't go according to plan as wells his successes.  His channel has really exploded in recent months and subscriber numbers are now well over 120K.  Well worth checking out

Serge Ramelli

I learned everything I needed to.know about Adobe Lightroom from Serge.  His free tutorials are fantastic and if you really want you can often download his RAW files to edit and along with the relevant video.

It is not just Lightroom though, Serge also uploads Photoshop tutorials as well as a host of other photography tutorials too.  If you want to be an expert in Lightroom, look no further than Serge.

Jimmy McIntyre

If you use HDR or exposure blending then Jimmy's channel is an ideal stop for you.  I have to admit I am fairly new to the whole exposure blending process but Jimmy's excellent tutorials are an absolute must.  Many of his tutorials revolve around his own software called Raya Pro - if you can afford it, buy it - it really is amazing, as well as exposure blending in Photoshop.  Jimmy talks us through the exposure blending process is laid back style, explaining the intricacies and how to achieve these effects.  You can achieve some remarkable results using exposure blending so this is channel is definitely worth checking out.

The Art of Photography

Hosted by Ted Forbes, this is another channel I have followed for a long time.  Ted is clearly a vastly knowledgeable guy who adores photography.  He offers vlogs which cover topics such as the history of photography, photo assignments and the excellent artist series where Ted meets a highly respected photographer to discuss their work and their work practices.

Have any reccomendations?  WHo do you subscribve to on YouTube?  Leave a comment below.

Stripping it all back: creating simple, minimalist photographs

As well as turning towards architectural photography I now find my self trying to simplify my photographs as much as possible.  I am trying to make simple, clean image, with a lot less post-processing.

I am really enjoying this challenge.  And it is a challenge; it is amazing how the urge to photograph 'the whole' can blind you to the more intimate shots available by spending just a little more time and searching out compositions.

I am trying to really focus on elements such as texture, shape, using line and shadow in order to create a more minimal composition. Let’s see where this takes me

I saw this shot of two doors while walking around town. I like the contrast of the colours and the brick work horizontals and the diagonals on the doors.

I saw this shot of two doors while walking around town. I like the contrast of the colours and the brick work horizontals and the diagonals on the doors.

I have to admit, I really like the 'facing' image below.  The composition is so simple.  White, black and grey, and I just love the contrast between the black lines and the light. I remember taking the shot and thinking this is the sort images I want to make from now on.  Simple, clean, and minimal.

What do you think?  Do you like this sort of photography?  Am I barking up the wrong tree?  How has your photography changed over the years?  Leave your comments below.

How to Split Tone in Adobe Lightroom

Split toning in Lightroom is simple and effective technique to boost colour in your photography.   It can be used in all types of photography.  I find I get the best results in my travel images, especially when boosting sunshine colours.

The shot above was taken at the entrance of the Kafka Museum in Prague, nothing special but it is ideal for highlighting how easily you can improve your images with this split toning technique.

Adobe Lightroom Split tone settings

In order to add a bit of summer sunshine to your photo you need to add yellows and oranges to your split toning.  Simply click the box next to Highlights and Shadows and choose our colour.  You don’t have to be too accurate with your choices as you can use the saturation and balance sliders to fine tune.  I should say that I very rarely go over 20 in saturation - I mostly use between 5 and 15 saturation as the intensity can be too overwhelming.

After spli toning: the image nowlooks has a a summer sunshine feel. Note the increased orange and yellow tones on the walls and ground

After spli toning: the image nowlooks has a a summer sunshine feel. Note the increased orange and yellow tones on the walls and ground